Tag: Google

zitstif-multibootmbr-usb-yumi-2.0.0.9-2017-07-11-19-img (zitUSB)

by on Jul.15, 2017, under Posts

Today I present to you a very useful tool that I would like to share with you. If you work in information technology or dabble around with it, this tool may be of great use to you. Inspired by http://www.hackfromacave.net/katana/, I have made my own multi-booting USB flash drive. This is not a replacement for Katana but just merely an alternative. I present to you: zitstif-multibootmbr-usb-yumi or zitUSB for short (URL to download is toward the bottom of the post).

This flash drive image not only has multiple distros on it, but has an array of useful tools for any ‘hacker’, computer enthusiast, network admin, technician, etc. Here is the root of the flash drive:

For those of you willing to look at the `tree` of this drive, here you go: http://zitstif.no-ip.org/usb/tree.txt

Here’s a list of the distros/bootable OSes:

For clarification: WDO is Windows Defender Offline, kav_rescue is kaspersky AV live CD, the Windows 7 Home Premium is basically any version of Windows 7 (via a method like this),  and there’s multiple versions of Clonezilla because I have ran into compatibility issues with certain systems.

TAKE NOTE THAT YUMI-2.0.0.9 IS ON THE ROOT OF THE DRIVE, USE THIS VERSION FOR ADDING OR REMOVING DISTROS! IF YOU USE ANY VERSION DIFFERENT TO ADD OR REMOVE DISTROS, YOU WILL POTENTIALLY MAKE YOUR FLASH DRIVE UNBOOTABLE!

I made an image of my flash drive using clone-zilla-2.4.2-61-i686-pae, however that version or any newer version should work in creating your flash drive.

A quick side note: I was able to boot off of this drive using a Macbook (13-inch, Late 2009). I first had to use Plop and then told the Macbook to boot off of USB. However, in the Yumi menu, the keyboard did not work and I had to use an external keyboard.

Requirements:

  • 1 Flash drive that is 32GB of larger
  • A computer with working USB ports
  • clone-zilla-2.4.2-61-i686-pae or newer and know-how for using clonezilla to restore an image (look here if needed)
  • patience to download an 18GB file
  • To use: a computer that supports CSM or legacy mode, system must also be x86 or x64, ARM is NOT SUPPORTED

Hashes:

zitstif-multibootmbr-usb-yumi-2.0.0.9-2017-07-11-19-img.rar
MD5: 0988fb81652742a595748ac723c8a787
SHA-1: 8adeb884baeff97a5c09721ae64ff6a5d88a96df

RAR content hashes (MD5):

ffe3d783099ca73716e2b640bfd831e7 blkdev.list

40bab056938e4c10321a605a093b32a6 blkid.list

e78a6e82dfbcd592ec3f3cac3845a734 dev-fs.list

ff0a4ce532aa9be376f4e49bc35fe572 sdd-pt.sf

d9aecb1e6f8b6be75219b313998ec8e0 sdd-chs.sf

890485aa018405d04fadcd3a51d71fd4 sdd-pt.parted

0989aa9d66fe2fbade298f8c6f1236db sdd-pt.parted.compact

ed356b009be474fef10efc60939de511 sdd-hidden-data-after-mbr

e2dbab6ba17e25d3ff12a179da13732e sdd-mbr

f0873661b3057fc74d65acaaf063ac64 sdd1.vfat-ptcl-img.gz.aa

b0bcbb15f49c38e2deaf9087bc2da5b0 sdd1.vfat-ptcl-img.gz.ab

0ebfd956346a0c1c6d72a1d385ef3b7a sdd1.vfat-ptcl-img.gz.ac

009174f7ddcc057f49e9dfc54da58d91 sdd1.vfat-ptcl-img.gz.ad

b303b75755c0815bbdcc69cb09540dfd sdd1.vfat-ptcl-img.gz.ae

7a466b46e75d7f2e58580a937b9fff74 info-lshw.txt

8eab9cdcaa09d256b20084b2e8839e15 info-dmi.txt

bdf55074c4e8720d2fa7c0a3bca7909b info-lspci.txt

4501bf778509426fba474f19fa0d0cf4 info-packages.txt

85396fcb9cb6ae3247dfdf0c34242ae4 parts

b1e4a422a5f04875f35577bf8856d688 disk

db0a67b885cff5a95ec3d745b0b33294 info-saved-by-cmd.txt

c5c44e45b2eed964753fbb6060caba23 clonezilla-img

Download:

File is hosted on Google Drive and MEGA.NZ. The URLs are available in a TXT file: http://zitstif.no-ip.org/usb/url.txt

sha1sum 654fc8f2d47ac3c4b8e31103ef819222f910a87e url.txt

Feel free to leave any feedback.

#8/3/2017 Due to limitations of MEGA.NZ, I have the file also hosted on Google Drive.

#7/22/2017 Currently trying to find another hoster outside of MEGA.NZ because MEGA.NZ limits how much you download at a time. (After downloading about 5GB, you have to wait about 5 hours until you can download more or you have to pay for a premium account. I’m currently looking into archive.org but I’m running into issues.) 

 

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THENEWLIST.txt update (THENEWLISTupdated.txt)

by on Sep.25, 2015, under Posts

I’ve compiled another HOSTS block list for those who want to block crap. If you’re not sure how to add the list to your hosts file, check out:

http://zitstif.no-ip.org/?p=570

You can download the updated HOSTS block list from here:

http://zitstif.no-ip.org/THENEWLISTupdated.txt

shasum: f94c3aee2e1483bc945e6a728ba8c70df821f5c3

Here’s a mirror:

http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?file_id=15983907671280562742

Enjoy less crap on the internet!

WARNING: I have tested adding this to my Windows 10 hosts and I have noticed svchost.exe (owned by NETWORK SERVICE) spikes up in CPU usage and DNS functionality stops responding momentarily until the mentioned process calms down in CPU usage. On my work computer running Windows 7 Professional in a domain environment the same service would spike up and seem to cause a DOS condition with DNS functionality and would not respond. USE WITH CAUTION AND TEST BEFORE DEPLOYING IN PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENTS.

#Update 10/9/2015

After testing and much consideration I do not recommend adding these hosts to your hosts list on Windows based systems unless they are higher end systems with cpu scores of like 8000 from https://www.cpubenchmark.net/

#Update 12/28/2015

This updated blacklist also causes issues with tennis.com comments section and Nexon account registration.

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Steps Toward Weaponizing the Android Platform

by on May.11, 2013, under Posts

(4/16/2015) – NOTE: THIS SOLUTION HAS BEEN KIND OF SUPERSEDED BY https://www.kali.org/kali-linux-nethunter/ , if nethunter doesn’t work for you then continue on with this post:

The mobile and tablet market have been flooded by millions upon millions of Android based devices. I wonder if Ken Thompson or Dennis Ritchie would have ever imagined that their invention from nearly 44 years ago would have influenced the likes of the Linux kernel,  Google, Apple, and beyond. We are now in a sea of Unix-like devices that now can easily fit in individuals pockets, which have multiple core processing power and can easily access SCADA systems with a few keystrokes.  It has never been a better time for pocket sized penetration testing devices.

In this article I will be covering ways that one can turn their Android based device into a powerful pocket sized penetration testing tool. If you’re looking to do wireless sniffing or packet injection with your Android based device, this article will be of little help. (If interested please see this, this, this, this, and this.) To do so, one needs a specific Android device that supports OTG, with a custom ROM, and you’ll most likely need an external USB wireless adapter. (Honestly, if you’re looking for a device for cracking WEP keys without any external USB wireless adapters, then I highly still recommend the Nokia N900.)

(NOTE: If you’re strictly looking to do wireless sniffing,  there is AndroidPCAP which I have tested with my Nexus 7 and a RTL8187 based wireless USB adapter.)

Firstly, before progressing on towards the weaponizing of your Android device, please take the time to back up any vital information. Have a look at this.  Reason being, is that you’ll need to root your Android based device. Depending on your device and the method of rooting, rooting your device and unlocking the bootloader can wipe your device.

Setting up Kali Linux ARM Chroot on your rooted Android based device that has about 6GB of free space

1.) Install BusyBox
2.) Install Terminal Emulator
3.) I created a Kali Linux ARM IMG that one can easily mount and it can be downloaded here:
http://goo.gl/qmGle
https://archive.org/details/Kali.nogui.armel.zitstif.chroot.482013

kali.nogui.armel.zitstif.chroot.482013.7z

md5: d60c5a52bcea35834daecb860bd8a5c7
sha1: f62c2633d214de9edad1842c9209f443bcea385d

kali.img

MD5: be61799f8eb2d98ff8874daaf572a1d5
SHA-1: f9c6a820349530350bbb902d17ae6b4a5173937c

NOTE: This image gives you about 2GB of free space in the environment to play with so use with care.

4.) Extract the 7z file and make sure that there’s a folder in this following location: /sdcard/kali
5.) In this folder you should have shell script named ‘kali’ and the ‘kali.img’ image file.
6.) To mount the kali.img file as root do this: sh /sdcard/kali/kali

Optional:
If you want Terminal Emulator to open up and go directly to the chroot environment do as follows:
1.) Open up Terminal Emulator
2.) Go to preferences
3.) Tap on Initial Command
4.) Enter this: su -c “cd /sdcard/kali && sh kali”

Now if you tap on Terminal Emulator, you’ll go directly to your Kali chroot environment. If you want to leave the environment and back to the Android command line, simply type exit.

Optional: If you want to access files from /sdcard/ from your Kali chroot envrionment, one way is to have an Openssh server on your Android device that listens on all interfaces. Then under your chroot envrionment do: mkdir /media/sdcard/ and then connect to your ssh server on your loopback interface to store the ssh key. Then you could use a script like this in your chroot environment (or even edit your .bashrc file to run it automatically):

http://zitstif.no-ip.org/mountsdcard.py #You’ll need to edit the username and password appropriately for your situation.

I should warn you that this Kali image is not setup with the idea of using a window manager or really any GUI tools. In my humble opinion to take advantage of Kali Linux, you don’t need a GUI. Using the terminal to access tools like nmap, netcat, w3af_console, sqlmap, xsser, and metasploit will be sufficient to get one started on their penetration test.

Once you’re in the Kali Linux chroot environment, please do the following:

apt-get update && apt-get upgrade && msfupdate

In addition to setting up the Kali Linux chroot environment, here are a list of other tools and a quick description of each that I recommend you to install:

2X Client – Remote desktop client
AndFTP – ftp/sftp client
androidVNC – vnc viewer client
AndSMB – Android Samba client
AnyTAG NFC Launcher – Automate your phone by scanning NFC tags
APG – OpenGPG for Android
CardTest –  Test your NFC enabled credit cards
Checksum –  basically a GUI tool for md5sum and shasum tools
ConnectBot – powerful ssh client
DNS Lookup – perform DNS and WHOIS lookups
Dolphin Browser – a browser that easily allows you to change your UserAgent
DroidSQLi – automated MySQL injection tool
dSploit – Android Network Penetration Suite
Electronic Pickpocket –  wirelessly read NFC enabled cards
Exif Viewer – shows exif data from photos and can remove this information
Fast notepad – simple but useful notepad application
Find My Router’s Password – title explains it all (mostly for default passwords)
Fing – very similar to Look@LAN tool for Windows
Goomanager –  see link for more information
Hacker’s Keyboard –  Miss the easily accessible CTRL key? This app is for you
HashPass – translate text into hashes
Hex Editor –  a very usable hex editor for Android
inSSIDer – wireless network scanner
intercepter-NG – multi-function network tool, sniffer, cookie intercepter, arp poisoner
IP info Detective – find out all sorts of info on an IP address
IP Webcam – turn your Android device into an IP security camera
Network Signal Info – basically a graphical tool for iwconfig
NFC Reader – used for reading various NFC technologies including some keycards
NFC ReTAG – Re-use/recycle write protected NFC Tags such as hotel key-cards, access badges, etc
NFC TagInfo -another NFC reader
OpenVPN Connect – open vpn client
Orbot – tor on Android
Packet Injection – poorman’s GUI version of scapy
ProxyDroid – use your socks5 proxy with this application
Root Browser – great file manager for Android
Routerpwn – test how secure your router is
SandroProxy – kind of like Webscarab
Secret Letter – a  poorman’s stegonagraphy tool
SSHDroid – openssh server for android
Supersu – manage what programs access root functions
Teamviewer – remotely control Windows, OSX, and Linux based systems
Terminal Emulator – no explanation needed
tPacketCapture – packet sniffer that doesn’t require root
VirusTotal Uploader – test your malicious payloads
Voodoo OTA RootKeeper – maintain root access even after updates
Wifi File Transfer – access files on your phone from a web browser via an http server
WifiFinder – simple wireless scanner
WiGLE Wifi wardriving – wardriving/warwalking application

Of course this is probably not complete, but I believe this is a very good suite of tools to get one started. If you can think of any more tools or if you have any suggestions, please feel free to leave a comment below.

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Nexus 4 – An Awesome Disappointment

by on Mar.02, 2013, under Posts

Back in the summer of 2012 I began reading about the Nexus 4. I had a lot of hope in this device due to the fact that Google is one of the most successful companies ever with Linux based devices. At the time I was still using my beloved Nokia N900 as my primary phone but I thought it was time to get something more powerful and more modern.

During the late summer of 2012, I decided to purchase a Nexus 7 as an experiment. I soon fell in love with this device due to the fact that it’s easy to root (I suggest that you use the Nexus 7 toolkit that is found on the XDA Developers forum). Also since it’s a Nexus device, it has a stock version of the Android OS and it can receive updates directly from Google instead of having to rely on a carrier for updates. This is one of the many reasons why I waited several months to purchase a Nexus 4.

On a side note, I strongly encourage you to root your Android device if you have the time, the know-how, and if you’re fastidious. Rooting your Android based device will unlock the full potential of it and you can potentially fix issues. (To root your Nexus 4, please see this.) There are many apps that even require root. For instance, there is StickMount. If your Android device pushes out 5 volts from the Micro-Usb port, you can connect a flash drive via an OTG cable.  You can even connect a hard drive that may be NTFS or HFS, if you have Paragon exFAT, NTFS & HFS+ installed.

Sadly, while you can do this with a Nexus 7, the Nexus 4 does not support OTG. Originally on the Nexus 4 product page, Google had stated that the Nexus 4 supported OTG but later redacted this detail. I agree with others that this felt like a bait-and-switch tactic. This is especially annoying due to the fact that the Nexus 4 does not have a microSD card slot. However, this is not the only annoyance with this device.

I dearly love SSH. I thought it would be wonderful to have a secure shell server on my Nexus 4. I even purchased SSHDroidPro. (Which works well but stores your password in clear text in a file located at /data/data/berserker.android.apps.sshdroidpro/shared_prefs/preferences.xml). If the Nexus 4 is charging, I am able to connect to SSH with little to no problems. If the Nexus 4 is on battery power and if the screen is on I am able to connect to SSH with no problems or delay. However, the Nexus 4 with the stock Android firmware either 4.2.1 or 4.2.2 if the screen is off, I am unable to connect to SSH on my phone or even ping my phone. Ergo without any modifications, if the phone is idle and the screen is off my SSH server is practically useless.

I was really disappointed with this. I heard rumors that Android 4.2.2 was suppose to fix this issue, however it doesn’t. Fortunately, there are brilliant minds who use the XDA Developers forum. There is a *fix* for this issue but it’s not quite perfect. By it not being perfect, I mean that SSH is usable but there are big delays between keystrokes. In addition, to install this fix you must have root and a recovery manager (I advocate using TeamWin) which some Nexus 4 users may not be technically savvy enough to attempt.

I am not the only Nexus 4 owner who has been thoroughly annoyed by this. Please see this, this, this, and this. Google I implore you to fix this issue and listen to your customers!

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THELIST.txt update (THENEWLIST.txt)

by on Dec.17, 2011, under Posts

In this post I am simply  doing an update to the ‘THELIST.txt’ file which is essentially a blacklist of web servers that are ad servers or have been found to be malicious. I have added more servers (mostly ad web servers). The file is accessible here:

http://zitstif.no-ip.org/THENEWLIST.txt
SHA1 (THENEWLIST.txt) = 02a2e93167f680a09f5047ef1b081483b680bfde

You can then download this file and append the output of ‘THENEWLIST.txt” to your hosts file.

For Microsoft Windows you will most likely have to do the following:

1.) iexplore http://zitstif.no-ip.org/THENEWLIST.txt
2.) Save the file to a location
3.) Run CMD.exe as an Administrator
4.) ‘cd’ to the directory where you saved ‘THENEWLIST.txt’
5.) Execute the following command: attrib -R C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
6.) Then execute this command: type THENEWLIST.txt >> C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
7.) Execute the following command: attrib +R C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts

For *nix hosts do:

1.) Gain root via: su or sudo -i
2.) chmod a+rw /etc/hosts
3.) printf “GET /THENEWLIST.txt HTTP/1.0\n\r\n” | nc -vv zitstif.no-ip.org 80 2>&1 | egrep -v ‘HTTP|Apache|Date:|ETag:|Accept-Ranges:|Content-|Connection:|Modified:|Connection’  >> /etc/hosts
4.) chmod a+r/etc/hosts && chmod a-w /etc/hosts

I hope this is useful to you. I think most people would like nearly ad free web browsing.  In addition to that, legitimate ad servers have been known to serve up malware:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-27080_3-20000898-245.html

So by using this file in tandem with the Adblock extension/plugin you can get for Firefox/Google-Chrome, you will be less annoyed by ads and not have to be too concerned about ads serving up malware for you.

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns feel free to contact me.

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