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To have a ‘hacker’ phone or not… that is the question

by on Oct.13, 2018, under Posts

Mr. Robot - Pwnphone

Can I recommend from my experience for any average Joe, security specialist, or even computer enthusiast to have a rooted, custom kernel, Nethunter Android based phone as their primary cell phone to rely on? Honestly no, unless you have the time, resources, and expertise to troubleshoot issues with the device. Don’t get me wrong, it is awesome to have a device that fits in your pocket that when setup right, can do nmap vulnerability scans, arp poisoning, run the Social Engineering Toolkit and a plethora of other tools/actions. But you have to remember, projects like Nethunter, which are great for what they are, are community driven and fixes/issues may have to be resolved by the end user themselves.

If you’re going to venture down this path, feel free to but take some things into consideration. If this is going to be your primary phone, in the event of an emergency, can you count on it to not freeze or reboot when you need it? This is not to say that vanilla/stock phones won’t let you down but usually the vanilla/stock phones have more support and tend to be more stable. So with a security suite like Nethunter, which is not a ROM but is meant to run on top of a stock Android OS with a custom kernel, in my humble opinion you’re only adding complexity to the device and more chances to have an unstable device.

Another question you have to ask yourself would include, do you trust all these tools/pieces of software on your primary phone that you may use for banking and private matters? By rooting your phone and installing the likes of Nethunter, you are potentially turning your phone into a more advanced spying tool that could be used against you. (Also take note that rooting your phone just makes it less secure.) Just think of this, if an adversary can get onto a server through whatever exploitative means and they discovered a Kali chroot environment, how much more potential damage could they do? Now imagine this ‘server’ is your phone that you constantly keep on and charged and with you at nearly all times.

This is to not say that I advocate against ‘hacker’ phones or turning phones into offensive security devices. My point is that there’s a lot to take into consideration.  If you want a stable phone to do your regular smart phone related matters on, I recommend something stock with little to no mods and if you want a ‘hacker’ phone, I recommend getting a second phone that you do not heavily rely on. 

Now if we could run virtual machines on our phones with security hardened hardware passthrough options… that would make things interesting. (Interesting discussion here .)

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Quick and dirty NAT/Firewall bypass using SSH and ngrok

by on Jun.13, 2018, under Posts

If you have a system that is behind a router/gateway/firewall device that you cannot poke holes in and you want to expose your system to the WAN, I recommend you check out ngrok. You can make a free account, download, and use the tool for free as well (with some limitations).

Once you have followed the simple instructions here, you can then put the ngrok executable into your $PATH (or %PATH%).  Provided if you have ssh listening on port 22 on your system that you’re trying to expose to the WAN, you can then simply run the following command: ngrok tcp 22. The output might look something like this:

Version 2.2.8
Region United States (us)
Web Interface http://127.0.0.1:4040
Forwarding tcp://0.tcp.ngrok.io:15551 -> localhost:22

Connections ttl opn rt1 rt5 p50 p90
0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.0

The beautiful thing about this is that you can see forwarding location by logging into your ngrok.com account and going to status. So this means you could script ngrok (via rc.local, shell:startup, crontab, etc…) to connect out on a regular basis and find the new forwarding location by going to your status page on ngrok.com. The port from my experience is dynamic and changes, but interestingly enough you have to remember to be careful, I was able to find other ssh servers and open ports by scanning  port ranges on 0.tcp.ngrok.io.

Want to access the internal network using a browser? No problem! In this instance you would simply do: ssh -D 8000 username@0.tcp.ngrok.io -p 15551 and then set your browser to use your socks5 proxy on 127.0.0.1 8000.

There are other similar services like like portmap.io and openport.io, but so far I like ngrok the best.

 

 

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K.I.S.S. Windows Server Backup Failure Notification Powershell script

by on May.03, 2018, under Code, Posts

$value = get-wbsummary | select -expandproperty lastbackupresulthr

if ( $value -ne 0 )
{
$EmailFrom = “YourGmailAccount@gmail.com”
$EmailTo = “WhoYouWantTonotify@domain.com”
$Subject = “Notification from Windows Server Backup”
$Body = “Last backup may have failed…”
$SMTPServer = “smtp.gmail.com”
$SMTPClient = New-Object Net.Mail.SmtpClient($SmtpServer, 587)
$SMTPClient.EnableSsl = $true
$SMTPClient.Credentials = New-Object System.Net.NetworkCredential(“YourGmailAccount”, “yourcleartextpassword”);
$SMTPClient.Send($EmailFrom, $EmailTo, $Subject, $Body)
}

The code is pretty self explanatory. (The main block I just found from howtogeek.com) Granted it is not secure because it’s storing a cleartext password. You can save this in a .ps1 file and create a scheduled task that runs with at least admin privileges (the function ‘get-wbsummary’ requires admin rights) after a backup has ran.

The $EmailTo variable you could use an SMS gateway to get a text notification. (See this list.) For instance if your phone number is 6165559876 and you have Verizon, it would look like this: $EmailTo = 6165559876@vtext.com.

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Kali Linux for WSL now available on Windows Store

by on Mar.06, 2018, under Posts

This is pretty neat:

https://tech.slashdot.org/story/18/03/06/1334255/kali-linux-for-wsl-now-available-in-the-windows-store

However, I have a couple concerns. First, how useful will it be? Currently on a Windows 10 system, I have WSL setup and nmap is essentially useless:

tester@Win10virtual:~$ sudo nmap -sP -n -T4 192.168.1.254

Starting Nmap 7.01 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2018-03-06 14:10 STD
dnet: Failed to open device eth0
QUITTING!

There is discussion about this issue here:

https://github.com/Microsoft/WSL/issues/1349

There is discussion of other network tools having socket related issues.

Second, how will AV handle tools like metasploit, powersploit, social engineering toolkit and the like that may set off AV engines?

I honestly think WSL is awesome but at this point I would recommend running whatever Linux distro of your desire on VirtualBox or the like.

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