Tag: metasploit


Sewing Patches in the Veil AV Evasion Framework

by on Aug.24, 2013, under Code, Posts

I have to admit that I am a little bit weary about the gaining popularity of Veil. AV evasion is really a game of cat and mouse, between the anti-virus companies and the individuals who are trying to evade detection. In this article we will be taking the role of the ‘mouse’ per se by working with this framework. We will first fix a bug in the framework and I will also show you how to use this framework in an ARM Kali chroot environment where wine is not readily available.

First, let us fix Veil because without this fix, Veil’s use under a Linux environment is diminished greatly. To get the Veil framework, you can either do:

git clone https://github.com/ChrisTruncer/Veil veil

Or

sudo apt-get install veil #If you have the right repositories or are using Kali Linux


To get the newest bleeding edge version, you’ll want to use the git method. However, if you use this method you will need to run the setup.sh script under the setup directory. This will handle the installing of the necessary dependencies. If you’re running an ARM Kali chroot environment on an Android based device, you will want to use ‘git’ because if you attempt to use apt-get to install veil, it will bomb out and give you an error message that wine is unavailable.

Upon my first use of Veil, I followed this post from the SANS Penetration Testing website closely. One issue I ran into was in the ‘How would you like to create your payload executable?‘ stage. The default method ‘Pyinstaller’ method did not seem to be creating an executable  in the veil/output/compiled/ directory, but it would create a source file in the source directory (which is still useful, more on this later).

I knew the framework relied on wine and a wine installed version of python to generate payloads under a Linux environment but wasn’t sure where to look for where this took place in Veil’s code. I started greping for wine in the Veil python modules and soon discovered this interesting piece of code that appeared to be the source of the problem.

Line 84 of the supportfiles.py file which is in the veil/modules/common/ directory contains this line of code:

os.system(‘wine ‘ + os.path.expanduser(‘~/.wine/drive_c/Python27/python.exe’) + ‘ ‘ + os.path.expanduser(‘~/pyinstaller-2.0/pyinstaller.py’) + ‘ –noconsole –onefile ‘ + payloadFile )

Due to the fixed path of ‘~/pyinstaller-2.0/pyinstaller.py’ for Veil to work with this current code, one must have this directory structure and files in their home directory. If you’re using Kali Linux, change this piece of code to ‘/usr/share/pyinstaller/pyinstaller.py’ and Veil will now create portable windows executables.

Before I discovered the source of this bug and simple fix for it, I took the harder route and attempted to create the portable executables under wine following these requirements (from https://github.com/ChrisTruncer/Veil/blob/master/README.md ) :

Windows

  1. Python (tested with x86 – http://www.python.org/download/releases/2.7/)
  2. Py2Exe (http://sourceforge.net/projects/py2exe/files/py2exe/0.6.9/)
  3. PyCrypto (http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/modules.shtml)

I soon learned there were issues with py2exe working under wine. py2exe under wine creates invalid windows portable executables. (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12170373/python-to-windows-executable-under-wine). I was then stuck with the Py2Exe method that relies on having a Windows machine readily available.

Veil Mobile Scenario

This then brings me back to the mobile scenario. To the best of my knowledge at the moment (and correct me if I’m wrong) you can’t install wine under an ARM Kali Linux chroot environment. So if you want to create payloads using Veil on your Android device, you will have to first obtain Veil via git. Secondly, there is no need to fix the code like I posted. You can leave the code as is.

You can now create python source files using either pyinstaller or py2exe under Veil. If you use the pyinstaller method, you will have to copy the files to a Linux machine that has necessarily dependencies for Veil and you can simply create an executable doing something like this:

wine ~/.wine/drive_c/Python27/python.exe /usr/share/pyinstaller/pyinstaller.py meterpreterpayload.py

Or you can use the py2exe method and copy the files to a Windows machine and compile your executable that way.

Other issues with Veil

One minor annoyance with Veil, is that I’ve noticed the portable executables are kind of hefty in size. If you create a payload using the pyinstaller method, the executable is about 2.4 megs and if you create one using the py2exe method under windows, the executable is over  5 megs. This is quite large in comparison to using msfpayload/msfencode or msfvenom, which creates payloads that are typically less than 100 kilobytes.

I would also like to see Veil being able to bind the obfuscated payload to non malicious executable like putty, however all in all I’m very impressed with this framework and hope the developers like Chris Truncer keep up the good work.

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Weaponizing the Nokia N900 – Part 4.0 – A Three Year Anniversary!

by on Nov.24, 2012, under Posts

Remember that the most valuable antiques are dear old friends.H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

I felt that this was an appropriate quote for my aging Nokia N900. What should I do with this phone? Should I throw it in the “Electronic Wasteland” in China and should I become just another Android user? Hell, I can even run Backtrack 5 on Android now! There are even reports that hackers have been able to get monitor mode and packet injection to work on Android devices!

However, what if I want to run a wide array of Linux based programs locally using my phone’s operating system without depending upon a chroot environment? What if I want a phone/device that has been known to be able to do packet injection, monitor mode, hostmode and not have to sign up for any large corporation’s software market like “Google Play” or Apple’s “App Store” to install software? Maybe I just want to use apt-get to install my programs for Christ’s sake! What if I just want to whip a device out of my pocket that I can quickly run mtr from to troubleshoot a client’s wireless network issues?

It is also nice to have a phone/device that has a physical keyboard versus a touch screen since in my humble opinion, I believe that touchscreen devices are meant for consuming than being productive.

I still believe the best phone for hackers is the Nokia N900 and it is a shame that Nokia decided to go the way of Microsoft. I personally believe that Nokia should have gone the route of an Android/Linux hybrid mobile operating system, but that’s just my opinion. We will have to see how well the Firefox OS or the Sailfish OS take off.

Android is a great mobile operating system but to me it is kind of a bastard version of the Linux operating system. Another problem with the Android platform is the sheer vast amount of different hardware manufactures there are. So by the time independent developers are able to get features like monitor mode working on one phone, chances are there are a dozen of other phones that have been released while the phone that the developers were able to get monitor mode working on will be given hardly much credence to.

Part of the beauty of the Nokia N900 is that it has ‘staying power’. This phone was released over 3 years go to this date. I still receive e-mails asking for support or giving me compliments on my work for the N900 which I appreciate dearly. There still is an active, smart and driven community around the world who develop applications and provide support for this phone, which I am very thankful for.

So what am I to do with this beloved device? A device that can be overclocked to 1.0GHZ, can run the OSX , can run Backtrack 5, do myriad of other tasks and is available for about $200.

Sadly, my Nokia N900 will no longer be used as a phone but as an MP3/Multimedia player that I can use for penetration testing! With about 32GB of internal storage and a MicroSD slot that can be use to extend the storage of the N900 from 32GB to 48GB, DLNA client/server support, a FM Transmitter, and Pandora client support, why would I want to shell out the extra cash for a new MP3 player that most likely won’t be able to run Metasploit locally and an OpenSSH Server?

This is why for the three year anniversary of the Nokia N900, I have written a bash shell script that helps automate weaponizing the Nokia N900 to save myself and I’m hoping many other individuals time for weaponizing the Nokia N900.

Before you download and run the this shell script, please read the following:

Firstly, I am not responsible if this program bricks/damages your N900 (but I can assure you as long as you follow my instructions you SHOULD be safe). For best results make sure you have flashed your N900 firmware to version pr1.3 (also for best results my shell script works BEST on freshly flashed N900s). I was not able to get my shell script to work properly with the pr1.2 firmware.

Plug your wall charger into your N900. Make sure you also have strong signal strength to your wireless network.

Once you have your N900 flashed, please root your N900 and install bash4. Then pull up the terminal on your N900 and as root do this:

ln -s /bin/bash4 /bin/bash

Next download this following script to your N900:

http://zitstif.no-ip.org/weaponizen900.tar

(sha1sum: c3699aea31c8ac91684e89bfdda7901bcc7f042e  weaponzenizen900.tar)

(Source code for main script is publicly viewable here: http://pastebin.com/4UXmAEQx )

Extract it via:

tar -xvf weaponizen900.tar

Then cd into the newly created folder called “n900project” and run as root:

bash weapoinzen900.sh

MAKE SURE TO FOLLOW AND PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO ALL THE PROMPTS FROM THIS PROGRAM! Installation typically for me took about 2 hours. If your Internet connection drops out for whatever reason, for the most part it is safe to run this program again!

For a list of tools that weaponizen900.sh installs for native use, please see this: http://zitstif.no-ip.org/listweapons.txt. You can also list the installed tools by typing on your N900 ‘listweapons’. It also installs this following kernel: http://talk.maemo.org/showthread.php?t=85665. With this kernel you can do monitor mode, packet injection, and hostmode with the N900. With hostmode on the Nokia N900, you can use an OTG cable and do forensics with your N900 with tools like testdisk!

PLEASE DO NOT USE THE GUI TO UPDATE YOUR N900! Do this at your own risk! TO SAFELY UPDATE YOUR N900 PLEASE USE A SCRIPT I CREATED CALLED “update”. To update programs that have been installed by your package manager run as root:

update modded

To update programs that have been installed by your package manager and programs like Metasploit, SET, Nikto, and etc run as root:

update modded scripts

I hope this script is of great use to anyone who decides to use it. If you have any issues with this program or need any help with this program feel free to contact me via e-mail. I want to thank the Maemo forums for support on this project.

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SSH Tricks And More! Presented By Kyle Young [GR-ISSA] (4-20-12)

by on Jun.03, 2012, under Videos

What was covered in this presentation: SSH basics, Offensive uses of SSH, Defensive uses of SSH, automating SSH through scripting languages, brief history of SSH, setting up a poor man’s VPN, using SSH with IPV6, attacks on SSH and more!

PowerPoint Slides available at:

http://ia601206.us.archive.org/32/items/SshTricksAndMorePresentedByKyleYoung/…

sha1sum: fb8a4132f57c12f6e49beeb18880b2d961d2e37c

Full video for download is available at:

http://ia601206.us.archive.org/1/items/KyleyoungSshTricksandMorevideo/KyleYou…

sha1sum: 3b862e15e9c6664040470034ef4c2f04ce2ad1e5

Part 2: http://youtu.be/h0mzoOsc85s

Part 3: http://youtu.be/ne-H7kGrw8w

Part 4: http://youtu.be/nLSSf8CXWqk

I want to thank the Grand Rapids ISSA chapter for allowing me to put on this presentation back in April.

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Meterpreter script – rogueap.rb – Abusing Windows Virtual Wireless NIC Feature

by on Oct.08, 2011, under Meterpreter Scripts, Posts

I found myself inspired by Vivek Ramachandran‘s videos, I thought I would take the honor in creating the simple meterpreter script that basically does what you see in the third installation of the Swse Addendum videos.

When I watched the third video I thought to myself, “This shouldn’t be too difficult to do”. From my perception, I think that Vivek was kind of hinting that he might have wanted to see someone in the info-sec community create a meterpreter script that does what you see in this video. I was glad to do this. 🙂

For penetration testers, this script means that they can now more easily setup rogue wireless access points by utilizing this script, that utilizes the soft ap feature that is implemented into Windows 7 and Windows 2008.

If the victim computers are part of a Windows domain and have wireless NICs, by automating Metasploit with a pass-the-hash attack and using my script, one could essentially automate deploying a series of rogue ap points throughout a domain. This would be kind of like a network worm.

If you’re curious about automating Metasploit, please see:

http://dev.metasploit.com/redmine/projects/framework/repository/revisions/8878/entry/documentation/msfconsole_rc_ruby_example.rc

My script gives the end user the option if they want to install the meterpreter service on the victim computer. I thought that giving this option would be ideal for if the victim computer ends up rebooting. If you were just to deploy the soft AP and run a binding payload, the binding payload most likely wouldn’t survive a reboot.

The script is available here:

http://zitstif.no-ip.org/meterpreter/rogueap.rb

http://zitstif.no-ip.org/meterpreter/rogueap.txt

If you have any issues and you need help, feel free to contact me. Additionally, don’t hesitate to modify the script if you need/want to do so.

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