mysqldict.py

by on Jan.22, 2010, under Code, Posts

After taking a few months to dilly about with python and learn the ins and outs of it to a certain extent, I decided to write a program that does dictionary attacks on mysql.

Plain text:
http://zitstif.no-ip.org/mysqldict.txt

Tar archive:
http://zitstif.no-ip.org/mysqldict.tar
MD5Sum: f0e07ca29cc783c6c27f3829f579d37e

The beauty of this program, is that it actually does a test on the remote host and tells you whether or not that the remote host allows remote MySql authentication.

Here’s a quick peek of mysqldict.py in action used inside of a bash shell script (IP addresses hidden of course):

:~/for i in $(httplast | egrep -v "${WANIP}|127.0.0.1|192.168."  | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq); do nc -z -w1 ${i} 3306; if [[ "$?" == "0" ]]; then ./mysqldict.py -t ${i}; fi; done
mysqldict.py:
Port 3306 on 115.##.##.#1 appears to be open..
A connection has been made and here are the results of the test:
This host does not allow remote administration on MySQL
mysqldict.py:
Port 3306 on 62.##.##.#1 appears to be open..
A connection has been made and here are the results of the test:
This host is open to MySQL dictionary attacks!
mysqldict.py:
Port 3306 on 66.##.##.#1 appears to be open..
A connection has been made and here are the results of the test:
This host is open to MySQL dictionary attacks!

If you’re wondering what the command ‘httplast’ is, let me explain. I’m too lazy to type out: cat /var/log/apache2/access.log , so I created an alias to do handle this for me.

The tool itself, I feel is pretty self explanatory, but if you have any questions feel free to leave a comment or shoot me an e-mail.

:,

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